1. Make A Home Water Park
 

Water play can be an excellent source of sensory therapy.

Making a Water Park in the comforts of your own yard can provide your child with special needs customized play to fit their individual abilities and comfort level.

 Some great home water features can include height adjustable water tables that allow a child that is able to stand or who is a wheelchair user be able to participate in water play.  

A family can take turns racing boats, or role playing a pirate game in search of gold. 

Another great feature are sprinkler attachments. 

There are a variety of sprinklers that can attach to your hose to give a child an opportunity to play in a really big spray of water or a small puddle depending upon water pressure. 

This is really great for children unable to submerge themselves in water but still want to feel the sprinkle of water. 

Small covered pools are also a fantastic option for a home water park. 

It allows a child with sun sensitivities to be able to play in a small pool while avoiding bright rays of sun. 

2. Movie Memories


Summer movies are a great theme for the summer. 

There are now a variety of theatres that offer sensory friendly showings for children with special needs wishing to experience a movie in theatres. 

These include showings of dim lighting and lowered sound with the comforts and understanding of other parents with special needs children sharing in the same experience. 

For children not yet ready or comfortable with a movie theatre setting, making a home drive-in theatre can offer a great family experience and build lots of fun childhood memories. 

All that is needed is a movie projector that you can set up against your garage or side of your home and all of you can pull up in wheelchairs and chairs to view an outdoor showing of your favorite movie!

3. Adaptive Bowling


Bowling makes a great family activity. 

It also serves as aiding in health benefits through muscle tone and strengthening and in some situations can even assist with bone density. 

Today, bowing centers have adaptive bowling equipment that allows even those in wheelchair to enjoy the sport. 

Bowling also offers a variety of social opportunities. 

There are many bowling leagues and families may even become friendly with other bowlers in different lanes. 

Forming new friendships for both their family and child with special needs. 

4. Miniature Golfing


Some miniature golfing facilities are working towards a special needs friendly area making it easier for children of all abilities to participate. 

More and more children are being able to participate using the Upsee, walkers, and gait trainers. 

Depending upon the facility even those in wheelchairs can play with the assistance of a parent or caregiver helping them putt. 

The very best and entertaining golf courses have great sensory features; water falls, volcanoes that explode, talking features that celebrate your hole in one! 

No matter what you’re guaranteed to build some beautiful summer memories!

5. Making a Fairy Garden


Children low to grow and plant gardens. 

However it’s not always super easy with limited mobility. 

A great way of getting around physical challenges when it comes to gardening is bringing the garden to your child’s level. 

Making a fairy garden is the perfect solution!  All it takes is a small planter, (a box, or plastic fairy tree stump planter) some soil, tiny plants, and figurines to put in your garden. 

These can be fairies, or they can be gnomes, or farm animals, or sea themes. 

You can make your fairy garden customizable to your child’s likes. 

It gives them a chance to watch something grow that they helped create and you can keep it indoors or outdoors even allowing them to rearrange their figurines in the garden throughout the summer. 

Remember to take lots of pictures so your heart never forgets these small summer treasures! 

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